CDC Study: HIV and Risk Behaviors Among Injection Drug Users

CDC Study: HIV and Risk Behaviors Among Injection Drug Users

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
TARGET Center

HIV infection rates among injection drug users in major metropolitans areas of the U.S. have dropped in recent years, according to the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) report HIV infection and HIV-associated behaviors among persons who inject drugs — 20 Cities, United States, 2015. Data, collected from 20 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), found that prevalence of HIV infection among persons who inject drugs was 7% in 2015, down from 11% in 2012. (In comparison, nationally, 9% of HIV infections in the U.S. in 2015 were attributable to injection drug use.) Other data highlights from the 20 MSA surveillance study: 

  • HIV infection prevalence was higher among blacks (11%) than whites (6%). However, white injection drug users were more likely than black users to share syringes (white: 39%; black: 17%) and injection equipment (white: 61%; black: 41%) in the previous 12 months.
  • Among HIV-negative respondents, 27% reported sharing syringes and 67% reported having vaginal sex without a condom in the previous 12 months; 52% received syringes from a syringe services program and 34% received all of their syringes from sterile sources.